Johnson & Associates Doula of Women's Health

2403 Bytham Court 

Windsor Mill, MD 21244

443-218-6684

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Just found out your pregnant? What to expect.

Congratulations! You're having a baby.


During the first trimester your body will undergo many changes. Hormonal changes affect almost every organ system in your body. These changes can trigger symptoms even in the very first weeks of pregnancy. Your period stopping is a clear sign that you are pregnant. Other changes may include:

Extreme tiredness, Tender swollen breasts. Your nipples might also stick out. Upset stomach with or without throwing up (morning sickness), Cravings or distaste for certain foods, Mood swings, Constipation (trouble having bowel movements), Need to pass urine more often, Headaches, Heartburn, and Weight gain or loss. As your body changes, you might need to make changes to your daily routine, such as going to bed earlier or eating frequent, small meals. Fortunately, most of these discomforts will go away as your pregnancy progresses. And some women might not feel any discomfort at all! If you have been pregnant before, you might feel differently this time around. Just as each woman is different, so is each pregnancy. Take your prenatal vitamin If you haven't started taking a prenatal vitamin yet, now's the time to start. It's particularly critical to get enough folic acid while trying to conceive and during your first trimester. Folic acid greatly reduces your baby's risk of developing neural tube birth defects such as spina bifida.

Many healthcare providers won't see you until you're at least 8 weeks pregnant, but you'll want to get on their calendar well before this since appointments can fill up fast.

To prepare, jot down the first day of your last period so your provider can determine your due date and start making a list of any questions that arise. Talk to relatives on both sides about your families' medical histories. Your provider will want to know whether any chronic conditions or genetic abnormalities run in either of your families.




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